Choice

Why Does the NAACP Oppose Charter Schools?. Paul E. Peterson. U.S. News & World Report. 2016. August 25, 2016.

The NAACP, at its national convention in Cincinnati, voted this July to support "a moratorium on the proliferation of privately managed charter schools." In Massachusetts, a local NAACP leader is campaigning against the charter-expansion referendum bill on the state ballot in November. Comparing charters to segregated schools, he shouted: "As Brown vs. the Board of Education taught us, a dual school system is inherently unequal."

Public School Teachers More Likely to Use Private Schools for their Own Kids. Paul E. Peterson, Samuel Barrows. 2016. January 11, 2016.

The Supreme Court, in Friedrichs v. California Teachers Association (CTA), is now considering whether all teachers should be required to pay union determined “agency fees” for collective bargaining services, whether or not the teacher wants them. When making their case, unions would have the public believe that public school teachers stand solidly behind them.

'No-Racially-Disparate-Discipline' Policies Opposed by Both Teachers and General Public. Paul E. Peterson. 2015. August 31, 2015.

n 2014 the U.S. Department of Education and the U.S. Department of Justice, acting together, sent every school district a letter asking local officials to avoid racial bias when suspending or expelling students.

Why Do Two Good Polls Get Different Results?. Martin West, Paul E. Peterson. 2015. August 31, 2015.

Two major public opinion polls have just been released. First, Education Next (EdNext) released its ninth annual survey of over 4,083 respondents, which is administered by Knowledge Networks. (Along with Michael Henderson, we are responsible for the design and analysis of this survey.) Shortly thereafter, Phi Delta Kappan (PDK) released its own survey of 3,499 respondents, which is administered by Gallup.

Common Core: How Much Do People Know About Its Real Impact?. Paul E. Peterson. 2015. August 13, 2015.

Earlier this week, my colleagues and I reported, as part of the 2015 Education Next survey of public opinion, that the level of support for the Common Core had slipped over the past two years from about two thirds to about half of the public. Yet opponents still number only about a third of the public, with the rest offering no opinion one way or the other.

Can Education Polls Be Scientific? Or Is It All Interest Group Politics?. Paul E. Peterson. August 22, 2013.

Three polls have come out within the past week: the Education Next (EdNext) poll, the Associated Press poll (about which I have commented previously), and, now the Phi Delta Kappan (PDK) poll, published by a journal with close ties to schools of education across the country.

The Public Supports Accountability and Common Core Standards. Paul E. Peterson. August 21, 2013.

While many in state capitols and Washington, D.C. are placing bets against state and national accountability systems that range from No Child Left Behind to Common Core State Standards, the public remains faithful to its long-standing commitment to hold schools, students and teachers accountable.

Latest Results on Common Core and Other Issues in EdNext and AP Polls. Paul E. Peterson. 2013. August 20, 2013.

Can we believe education polls? Do different education polls yield different responses? We know from presidential election polls that most polls yield results that do not differ more than a few percentage points, but, then, the question posed is almost exactly the same: Who do you plan to vote for? Further, those polls are about a topic that has been given intense publicity for a prolonged period of time. How about education polls, which ask people their views about matters to which the media give much less attention?

While K–12 Schools Resist, Digital Learning Disrupts Higher Education. Paul E. Peterson. 2013. August 14, 2013.

“By 2019 about 50 percent of courses will be delivered online,” wrote Clayton M. Christensen and Michael B. Horn in a pathbreaking essay in 2008 (“How Do We Transform Our Schools?” features, Summer 2008).

Peter Flanigan
Peter Flanigan: A True Friend of School Choice. Paul E. Peterson. 2013. August 05, 2013.

School vouchers never had a better friend than Peter Flanigan. It was not Peter’s direct philanthropic contributions. Although he gave generously from the wealth accumulated as an investment banker, others—such as the late John Walton—drew upon deeper pockets to donate more to the common cause. Nor was Peter a theoretician who could expound the case for vouchers with Friedman-like brilliance.

Common Core State Standards: Do You Need To Be Proficient In Order To Be Proficient?. Paul E. Peterson. 2013. July 12, 2013.

In response to the article on the disparity in state proficiency standards that Peter Kaplan and I published earlier this week, one reader, Scott McLeod, referred (in a comment) to an article arguing that that “proficiency” as defined by the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) does not really mean proficiency.

A Reply to NCTQ’s Defense of its Rating System. Paul E. Peterson. 2013. June 28, 2013.

In my June 25 blog post, I reported that effective Florida teacher preparation programs received no better ratings by the National Council on Teacher Quality (NCTQ) than ineffective ones.

Do the NCTQ Rankings Identify Schools of Education that Produce Graduates Who Are Effective in the Classroom?. Paul E. Peterson. 2013. June 25, 2013.

The National Council on Teacher Quality, in conjunction with U. S. News and World Report, has issued an ambitious report evaluating the quality of teacher preparation programs in schools of education across the United States. But its critics argue that the report fails to show that its measure of program quality is correlated with the classroom effectiveness of a school’s graduates. If the information available to us for a few teacher preparation schools in Florida is at all representative, the critics may have a point.

U.S. Institute of Education Sciences Weighs In on Voucher Impacts on College Enrollment. Paul E. Peterson, Matthew M. Chingos. 2013. May 14, 2013.

Last summer, we released the first experimental study of the effect of school vouchers on college enrollment. Our study, which is published in the current edition of Education Next, generated significant controversy.

A Generation of School-Voucher Success: African American kids in New York were 24% more likely to attend college if they won a scholarship to attend private school. Matthew Chingos, Paul E. Peterson. The Wall Street Journal. August 23, 2012.

President Barack Obama last month signed an executive order promising to "improve outcomes and advance educational opportunities for African Americans." The order instructs federal agencies to "promote, encourage, and undertake efforts" to increase "college access, college persistence and college attainment for African American students." Unfortunately, his administration remains opposed to the Opportunity Scholarship program in Washington, D.C., which lets students—mostly low-income and African-American—use a voucher to attend a private school.